Tag Archives: food preservation

Green Moms Carnival – Food Preservation

Welcome to the July Green Moms Carnival! I’m so excited to be hosting the carnival especially with Food Preservation as the topic because I think that food is one of the first ways that many moms choose to “go green,” by opting to eat seasonally and locally.  Once you’ve found your farmers you can learn to save money and enjoy that produce year-round by buying in bulk and preserving it.   Please take the time to visit each post!

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Food Preservation Basics

Tiffany from Nature Moms Blog gives a nice summary of different types of food preservation, along with some tips for getting started in her post Bringing Food Preservation Back to Our Kitchens.

Katy of Non-Toxic Kids (and my Moms Clean Air Force teammate) shares 3 Ways to Preserve the Summer Bounty.  Berry picking is a great way to teach your children where their food comes from and get some great pictures of ruby stained faces.  Katy also suggests pesto (yum!) and baked goods as ways to preserve.

Laura of Pug in the Kitchen shares tips for preserving food with little ones underfoot in her post Preservation: Pickles, Jelly and Sanity.  I’ve found that my canning has dropped way off (as in, come to a dead stop) since I had Joshua because big pots of boiling and a baby who wouldn’t let me put him down were not a combination I wanted last summer. 

Michelle of Green Bean Chronicles writes about canning, freezing, dehydrating, fermenting and not preserving in her post There is More Than One Way To Skin A… at The Green Phone Booth.

Canning

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There are so many different ways to preserve food, but many people think of canning first.  I have loved seeing the resurgence of canning in the past few years.  It’s hip to can! Can you believe it? 

Deanna of Crunchy Chicken, one of my long-time favorite blogs, contributed some fantastic canning recipes.  Just the titles make my mouth water!

Lisa from Condo Blues and Lazy Budget Chef writes about her first canning experience in I Canned Jam and Nobody Died.  There are so many people who are afraid of canning, but once they try it they realize how easy it can be! It’s blueberry jam, by the way.

Mary Clare from In Women We Trust totals up the return on a $20 seed investment in her post Can Yourself – Grow Money, Grow Friends.  You’ll be shocked!

Anna from Green Talk shows us how she has worked on Greening the Tomato Sauce Process.  There are great pictures to walk you through the steps of using a tomato press.

Linda of Citizen Green shares her tried and true recipe for marinara sauce in her post Use Your Garden Tomatoes in this Sauce.  It’s versatile and can be canned or frozen.

For those of us with a pressure canner and nerves of steel, Jena from Married to the Farm tells us about Pressure Canning Green Beans.  Don’t be scared!

I want to also share a few of my own favorite canning recipes from here at Farmer’s Daughter:

Freezing

Photo Credit: Laura from A Pug in the Kitchen

Lisa from Condo Blues and Lazy Budget Chef shares step-by-step tips on How to Freeze Fresh Tomatoes, for those of us who are a little too scared of the pressure canner.

Zoie at TouchstoneZ shares various ways to make organic strawberries from the local farmer’s market last and finds making freezer jam is even sweeter with her kids and a little reggae on the side in her post We’re Jamming.

Anna from Green Talk walks through the steps of Cooking Pumpkin and Squash for Easy Winter Storage.  She reminds us not to forget the seeds!

Karen from Best of Mother Earth explains that while she doesn’t do a lot of preserving, she does cook from scratch and makes sure not to waste the leftovers in her post How Do You Preserve Food?

Emily from Live Renewed shares a step-by-step tutorial for freezing fruit, along with a neat tip for pitting cherries, in her post Preserving Summer’s Bounty – Freezing Berries.

Lori of Groovy Green Livin shares how to find, freeze and thaw blueberries, as well as their health benefits in Preserve Summer: How To Freeze Blueberries.

Diane from Big Green Purse Blog shares a step-by-step tutorial on how to freeze tomato sauce in her post Make Your Own Delicious, Organic Tomato Sauce. Here’s How.

I love to freeze sweet corn for use in soups, stews and cornbread throughout the year. 

Drying/Dehydrating

Deanna of Crunchy Chicken shares Drying Herbs for Idiots.

Beth of My Plastic-free Life shows us how to make dried apple slices and fruit leather in her post Dry Summer Produce to Keep Through Winter Plastic Free

Mama Bear runs through a pro/con list of dehydrating in her post Kitchen Adventure: Drying Strawberries.   She outlines how to use the oven to dehydrate food.

Cold Storage

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Jena from Married to the Farm shows us how to store carrots throughout the winter in her post How to Store Carrots, and Save them for Seed

Dairy

Deanna of Crunchy Chicken shares:

Marci of Down on the Farm has two grass-fed Jersey milk cows and is in my opinion an expert cheesemaker! Check out her how-to’s:

Do you know what kefir is? I didn’t until I read the following two submissions. Now I want to try some! I have one question, how do you pronounce “kefir”?

Micaela of Mindful Momma‘s husband John shares how he makes homemade kefir in his guest post Kefir Madness.  Can I just say how cool it is that there’s a DAD joining the Green Moms Carnival?

Jen of Puddle Jumping shares her very low-maintenance kefir making system in her post Easy Homemade (Refrigerator) Kefir. I’ve gotta get me some of that kefir.

Baking in Bulk

Betsy from Eco-Novice shares her recipes for baking in bulk and freezing, which means she can have homemade food in a pinch!

Miscellaneous

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Deanna of Crunchy Chicken shares Homemade Rosolio and Candied Orange Peels.

Brenna of Almost All the Truth shows us how to reduce food waste and eat more of the green leafies with her post Getting Greens with Organic and Fresh Green Smoothies.

Phew! What a huge carnival! There were a grand total of 45 submissions! (Unless I counted wrong, my eyes are tired from all this typing!)  I want to send a special welcome to our new participants Marci, Zoie, Brenna and Jena.  Jena is a VERY new mom to her son Kent. Congrats Jena!

Thank you everyone for joining the Green Moms Carnival! Next month’s topic is Back To School and will be hosted by Micaela of Mindful Momma. The deadline is August 4 so get writing!

Please join in by sharing a link (or two, or a few) to your favorite food preservation post.

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Filed under Adventures, Food, Living from Scratch, Local Agriculture, Recipes, Sustainable Living

Zombie Q-pocalypse

Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse with Coupons…

Those of you who belong to or follow the doomer blogs probably have heard of the importance of preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse by stockpiling food and other necessities that could be disrupted.  Now of course we’re not actually talking about zombies, we’re mostly talking about fossil fuel supply disruptions leading to power outages, empty grocery shelves, etc., that could last indefinitely. 

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I don’t typically talk about the apocalypse (in fact, I had to slow down and think about how to spell it each time I typed the word), but on some days I definitely fall into the “doomer” category.  I do, however, try to be an optimist.  But I think it’s important to have a supply of food and other necessities for emergencies that are more likely to occur, for example- power outages due to weather extremes, which will only become more likely thanks to our changing climate.  In fact, there are some people in our state who were without power for a few days after a strong system of thunderstorms moved through last week.  We didn’t lose power here, but in the event of such an outage, I can be sure that we’d be near the end of the priority list for the utility companies to turn the power back on.  They’re concerned with getting the electricity back on for the most people in the quickest amount of time, and since we live on a dead-end street with less than 10 houses, I’m pretty sure we’re low priority.  The big problem for us is water, since we have a well, so if the power goes out so does the water.

What does this have to do with coupons, you ask? After a recent discussion with a colleague who’s gotten into couponing, I realized how coupons could be the ticket to developing food stores for families like mine who simply can’t afford to go out and buy a stockpile of food when it’s not on sale.  Confession time: I never even looked at coupons until about two weeks ago.  I always figured that my store card gave me discounts and if I shopped the sales, I’d be all set.  But then I watched an episode of “Extreme Couponers” and started to feel like a chump! Here I’ve been, paying full price for most items all along, when I could be getting them for cheap or free! Who couldn’t use more money?

While I don’t plan to go the route of the extreme couponer, since I don’t need a “toothpaste room” or 100’s of containers of mustard, it couldn’t hurt to buy, say, an extra jar of vitamins or boxes of pasta when they’re on sale and I have a coupon.  The coupon discussion came up in the Green Moms Carnival yahoo group a few weeks ago and the consensus was that most of us won’t benefit from coupons because we tend to cook from scratch and avoid processed packaged foods, which are the majority of coupons.  However, I think there are some items that even the avid home cook should consider using coupons for: pantry staples that won’t go bad, basic cleaning supplies like baking soda and borax, vitamins, even bottled water. 

Now, I am typically opposed to bottled water but have come to the conclusion that I should have a few bottles in my pantry in case of emergency, since our water goes out with the power.  It’s a good idea to fill the bath tub before a storm so you’ll have water to flush the toilet, but that water’s not potable and I think it’s a dangerous practice with children in the house.  With a toddler, I’m simply not going to do that and will have to just resign myself to use flushes wisely.  You can, of course, use clean soda bottles with a drop of bleach for storing water, but that sounds like a lot of work to me.  If I have a coupon for bottled water, and that water goes on sale, why not stock up a little bit for pennies? It seems like a smart thing to do.

So, my resolution.  Once I’m out of school, I’m going to take both couponing and food storage more seriously.  I’m going to clean out and organize my kitchen and pantry, clip coupons, look for sales, and start stocking up on items I’ll actually use.  Since I’m hosting the July Green Moms Carnival and the topic is Food Preservation, I’ll be knee deep by then!  That picture above was my pantry back before I was a mom.  Look how orderly it was! Those days are gone, haha!

If you’re new to food storage, check out The Chatalaine’s Keys (formerly Casaubon’s Book) for a wealth of info.  And since I’m new to couponing, please share your tips in the comments!

This post is my contribution to the June Green Moms Carnival: Half-Year Resolutions, hosted by OrganicMania.

PS- I say “COO-pon” but I’ve noticed that all the extreme couponers say “Q-pon.”  How about you?

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Filed under Food, Home, Living from Scratch, Sustainable Living